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20130812
20130812
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, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
, it is a scandal. but if it came up in the of the context that you raised first, it's just part of life in america. >> ladies and gentlemen, on that note, floyd has kindly agreed to sign his book. again, critics have given it an incredible review, and it's just a breathtaking book. i've read and it's breathtaking. i would strongly urge you to have your book signed by floyd but if you could just remain seated for about 20 seconds. my last question to float, could you tell us if the society for challenge into getting and the supreme court questioning? [laughter] >> certainly much more relaxing. >> actually. on outlook know, ladies and gentlemen, please join me in thanking one of the most brilliant scholars and lawyers that this nation has had that has impacted many of our lives on a regular basis. thank you. [applause] >> you are watching tv on c-span2. 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend. >> up next, booktv's peter slen into his office and one. this weaknesses concludes with military historian antony beevor followed by victorian era expert judith flanders. antony beevor talked ab
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
economically robust parks program in america. we had a cell phone app, parka meanttionv, park hours, park programs. we can now register online and having wi-fi in our parks will make it easier for park users and frankly our staff to deliver the programs and services that the public expects in our open space. so, we're thrilled ~. government can't do it alone any more, so, this is really about partnership. we're so thankful to google and veronika, thank you for hanging with us. thank you to sf city. a big thanks to mark, supervisor farrell for stewarding this. and also a big thanks to the mayor who has really given us room to be innovative, room to pursue public private partnerships and has really supported innovation in our parks. and, john, thank you for hosting us here. supervisor avalos has been an incredible advocate for our neighborhood parks and one of the things great about this gift, this is not just going to parks frequented by tourists or destination parks. this is a benefit that is going into our neighborhoods. so, we're really thrilled. the last folks i want to thank are my ow
to revolutionize high-speed travel in america. phil lebeau joins us now. we understand his announcement, more details in maybe an hour's time. >> we'll hear about the hyperloop, or at least his vision of it. the hyperloop hoopla is what we're looking at, because we don't have an indication of what he's going to tell us. he told us it's a theory. not a company he's forming. it's his vision of the future. it will be solar-powered and have the cost lower than what it would take to take a comparable trip in planes or trains. he tweeted a few hours before he pulled an all-nighter developing his hyperloop plan. the hyperloop will have an open architecture, so in other words, if other technology companies, other software engineers, if they want to add to the hyperloop that he throws out there, that's a possibility. i want to show you the animation, because this is the vision of a company out of colorado. et-3, it's developing tube transport technology. it's already issuing licenses to technology partners, similar to what musk has talked about, an open architecture. et-3 says tube transport costs wil
.s. assets, and flatt tells cnbc there continues to be a lot of investment opportunity in america. flatt says he's bullish on the u.s. because housing, retail and manufacturing are all making a comeback, and he sees possibilities in the shale gas revolution. flatt also mentioned he's looking for value plays in europe and emerging markets. it's always fascinating to know how billionaires are investing *their money. insider monkey reveals warren buffett and others are buying shares of davita. the company owns kidney dialysis centers. billionairs are also bullish on sirius satellite radio company verisign. another popular stock with 1-percenters is an internet registry services company. and billionairs are also big on credit card stock visa. investors are keeping their eyes on priceline. the stock is closing in on a milestone: $1,000 a share. in its latest earnings, priceline notes "tremendous momentum" going forward. strength in europe helped revenues. noodles and company, which went public earlier this summer, is trading lower after its first set of earnings failed to increase investor appet
. >> is it likely? >> i don't know the answer to that unfortunately because law enforcement management in america at the federal level is a disaster. >> do you agree with that, mitch? that's a pretty big statement. >> those are strong words for somebody who used to be a u.s. attorney. he outranks me. i'm not going to try to take that one out. >> you must be right. possible certainly isn't a lot of support for the federal prosecutions that we have in this country. >> i have great respect for the agents and the u.s. attorneys around the country who do a very difficult job. i was a u.s. attorney, i was an independent counsel. i've had a lot of experience. but i'm going to tell you something, federal government has gotten too big, federal law enforcement agencies have gotten too big. they are manageable. nobody know what is they're doing. look at the latest story about how the dea is providing information to the nsa interc t intercepts and are being told to lie to federal judges about it. you cannot have law enforcement functioning where they are told it's okay to lie to a federal judge about how a
when many of us deployed to central america on humanitarian missions -- all of the skill sets paid us benefits in the 90s and 2000. how do we want to have that dynamic training that will keep people in the guard? we are really pushing this hard right now. we have to have the opportunity to fill vacancies. whether it is a critical chart or a chart fall for two or three years. some of you remember the keep up program, where folks can get away from an employer. the family situation is right. they can go close to an active duty bill, especially to the joint world. to focushat we ought on. it starts with getting the active component, the reserve component, structured right for the future. -- he is heading to the marine forces commander reserve. commanding general of our larger organization. first marine general to command nato forces, general mills. >> as a new one on the panel i will say that i came to work with the reserve component with the greatest respect the cousin twice on the battlefield both in iraq and at -- in iraq and afghanistan. one of the biggest challenges is maintaining th
-interest in america's cultural war. she writes on family, feminism, homosexuality, affirmative action and campus political correctness. she helped publish a book entitled radical and chief which was exposing obama's lost years that nobody knows
a lot because they sell a lot in north america and same with international including china. finally for gm, the important thing to focus on here is that asia is increasingly being driven by the chinese market, and they are putting more of an emphasis on china when it comes to vehicle development. it's a big change from the early 2002 to 2003 when they bought dae woo out of south korea. at that time, keep in mind, 10, 12 years ago, they had very little expertise when it came to small cars. they needed dae woo, and that's a shame and gm is looking at how can it lower its cost and the record is that they are considering lowering production there. >> thanks very much. over to josh lipton for a three market flash. >> free acquisition to tell you about beginning with dole fruit, well in the green. agreed to be taken private by chair and ceo who raised his offer and back in june he over it at $12 a share. also, pin pall foo-- pinnacle fs down. both companies are leading players in the growing field of aviation information management. tyler, back to you. >> all right, thank you very much, j
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11